EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MEET THE TEAM BEHIND SASRIM

Mareli Stolp

Mareli Stolp

SASRIM Chair

chair@sasrim.ac.za

Mareli Stolp completed her Bachelor of Music (2002) and Master of Music (2006) degrees at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, as a student of Joseph Stanford. During this time, she received numerous prizes and awards, such as the Unisa South African Music Scholarship (1999), the Vladimir Viardo Prize (1999), and the Pretorium Trust Bursary (2002). She completed the Unisa Teacher’s Licentiate Diploma (2001) and the Unisa Performer’s Licentiate Diploma (2002), both with distinction.

Between 2003 and 2006, she was a student at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam in the Netherlands, where she studied with Håkon Austbø. She completed a Bachelor of Music Degree at the Conservatory of Amsterdam in 2006, specialising in music of the 20th Century. While in The Netherlands, she worked with ensembles such as the “Ensemble voor Nieuwe Muziek”, “De Nieuwe Opera Akademie” and the Orchestra of the Conservatory of Amsterdam, and performed widely in the Netherlands and Belgium. With her duo partner, Canadian cellist Sybil Shanahan, she formed the group “Duo Afri-Can” in 2008, and has performed in South Africa, Italy, Switzerland and the Netherlands.

Since returning to South Africa in 2006, Mareli Stolp has been active as performer and teacher, with engagements at the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival (2008, 2009, 2011), The Standard Bank National Arts Festival (2013) and Aardklop National Arts Festival (2009, 2010). As adjudicator she has served on panels for the SAMRO International Scholarship Competition (2012), South African Society for Music Teachers Regional Competition (2014) and the Grahamstown Music Competition (2014). She completed an Artistic Research PhD at the University of Stellenbosch with Professor Stephanus Muller in 2012; since then she has held positions as a fulltime lecturer at Rhodes University, Grahamstown and as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the University of South Africa.

Lizabe Lambrechts

Lizabe Lambrechts

Vice Chair

lambrechts@sun.ac.za

Lizabé Lambrechts is a Volkswagen Stiftung Research Fellow at Stellenbosch University, and the Project Manager for the Hidden Years Music Archive Project (HYMAP) at the Documentation Centre for Music (DOMUS). The Hidden Years Music Archive is one of South Africa‘s most prominent collections of popular music from the late 1950s to the early 2000s that was for the most part not recorded commercially.

Her current research is focused on investigating popular music communities in South Africa through an oral history project of the musicians documented in the HYMAP collection, and extensive archival work that includes sorting and cataloguing the collection. As a curator, she strives to offer dynamic perspectives on the complexities of such collections and her exhibitions and publications reflect on the construction of the archive, memory, music and place in South Africa.

Ignatia Madalane

Ignatia Madalane

Treasurer

treasurer@sasrim.ac.za

Ignatia “Iggy” Madalane holds a BMus degree and an MA in music research from the University of the Witwatersrand with a dissertation titled, “Ximatsatsa: Exploring Genre in Contemporary Tsonga Popular Music.” Her article, ‘Tsonga Popular Music: Negotiating Ethnic identity in ‘Global’ Music Practices’, appears in the Journal of Musical Arts in Africa (2014). ‘From Paul to Penny: The Emergence and Development of Tsonga Disco (1985-1990s)’ is currently (2015) in print with the African Music Journal. Her research interests also include issues of gender and identity in popular music studies.

During her period at Wits, Iggy was the recipient of numerous prizes, awards, and scholarships, including, SAMRO Music bursary, National Arts Council bursary, Anton Hartman Trust bursary, Ellen Daniel Bursary, Abraham and Olga Lipman bursary. In 2007 she was awarded the Wits Residence Life Top Achievers Award.

Between 2010 and 2011, Iggy completed a Music Librarian internship with the SABC. In 2011 she was awarded a certificate for participating in a Tutoring Workshop at Wits. Together with her former colleagues from Wits, Iggy won the Faculty of Humanities Team Teaching award in 2013. Iggy also has a Certificate in Business Practice from Pretoria Technikon (now Tshwane University of Technology).

Iggy currently lectures undergraduate modules in music history and society at the University of South Africa (UNISA). She is also a singer/songwriter, and performer. Not only does she work as a solo performer/recording artist, she has also worked with various artists including award winning SA gospel artist Benjamin Dube, renowned pianist Jill Richards, Sankofa Marimba Band, composer Philip Miller, and Pedro Espi Sancis. Her single is available online and is titled ‘Swiringene’. In 2010, she travelled with Sankofa to Mexico to represent South Africa at the International Marimba festival. Iggy has also done some collaborative work including a multimedia exhibition titled Beaches Ritual (UNISA staff exhibition, 2015) with Yvette Dunn, a dance/theatre production called Re/Naissance and Witness (2012) with Prince Totto Amani, which was loosely inspired by Justice Edwin Cameroon’s Witness to AIDS (2005) and the Rwandan 1994 genocide. In 2005 she was a participant at the South African National Youth Choir camp, conducted by the late gifted choir master and music teacher Walter Edward Butt.

Stephanie Vos

Stephanie Vos

Secretary

secretary@sasrim.ac.za

Stephanie is in the final year of her doctoral studies at Royal Holloway, University of London. She completed her undergraduate and masters degrees at Stellenbosch University, after which she was a lecturer in musicology at the University of South Africa for two years. During this time, she convened two symposia on Music and Exile (2010 and 2011) in partnership with the Goethe Institut, Johannesburg. Her disciplinary interests have broadened from historical musicology in her masters degree to ethnomusicology and jazz in her doctoral research. She is currently writing about discourses of exile in South African jazz and popular music of the 1960s, with a particular focus on the early career of Abdullah Ibrahim.

Stephanie has presented her research at a number of conferences, including the annual conference of the Society for Ethnomusicology (Pittsburgh, 2014), the Hearing Landscape Critically conference (Harvard, 2015), the Doctoral Workshop in Ethnomusicology (Hildesheim, 2014) and the annual conference of the South African Society for Research in Music (2008 and 2009). Last year, she organised film screenings of the Aryan Kaganof’s documentary, An Inconsolable Memory in London, funded by the Being Human Festival of the Humanities. In a teaching capacity, she has lectured and tutored various courses in world music, sociology of music, critical musicology and analysis, and was a recipient of Royal Holloway’s Team Teaching Prize in 2013.

Stephanie is looking forward to return to South Africa in 2016 to pursue her next research project.

Sylvia Bruinders

Sylvia Bruinders

sylvia.bruinders@uct.ac.za

Dr. Sylvia Bruinders is Senior Lecturer and Head of African Music and Ethnomusicology at the South African College of Music where she teaches courses in Ethnomusicology, African and World music. A former Fulbright scholar, her dissertation on the Christmas Bands Movement in the Western Cape received the Nicholas Temperley Award for Excellence in a Dissertation in Musicology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

In 2012 she received the African Humanities Program Postdoctoral Fellowship funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to write a monograph based on her doctoral research from which she has already published several articles and book chapters. She is collaborating with photographer Paul Grendon to write a popular book on the Christmas Bands for which she was awarded the ANFASA Grant Scheme for Authors in 2014. She is Reviews Editor of the Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa (JMAA) and Director of World Café, a radio programme broadcasting on Fine Music Radio and has trained many students as compilers and presenters since 2006. She was selected as a Presidential Fellow of the African Studies Association to present her research at the 2015 Annual Conference in San Diego in November 2015. She enjoys Pilates, swimming and leisurely walks.

Santie de Jongh

Santie de Jongh

santiedj@sun.ac.za

Santie de Jongh holds the qualifications of HED (Windhoek Teachers Training College, 1989), BMus (Stellenbosch University 2001), Post Graduate Diploma in Library and Information Science (University of Cape Town 2004) and MMus (Stellenbosch University 2008). Her MMus degree entails the design and construction of a comprehensive national directory of music archives, collections and special materials.

As Music Special Collections Librarian, she is responsible for the day to day running and administration of the Documentation Centre for Music (DOMUS), where her duties include the archival processing (ordering and conservation) of materials and postgraduate research support. She is actively involved in facilitating research on DOMUS collections (this includes advising music researchers on archival processing and preservation). She is the South African Corresponding Editor for Fontes Artis Musicae and also serves on the continental steering committee of RILM.

Claudia Jansen van Rensburg

Claudia Jansen van Rensburg

claudiavanrensburg@yahoo.com

Claudia Jansen van Rensburg completed a BA (Music) degree in 2007 at the University of Pretoria and thereafter spent a year in Moscow, Russia at the Gnessin Academy of Music as a foreign student – here she also took master classes. After returning to South Africa, Claudia enrolled for a BMus (Hons.) at the University of Stellenbosch.

In 2012 she completed her Masters degree in Musicology under the supervision of Prof. Stephanus Muller at Stellenbosch University. She is currently enrolled as a PhD Candidate in Musicology at Stellenbosch University. Her thesis explores musical strategies of settlement and migration in the Western Cape.

Felicia Lesch

Felicia Lesch

fsmlesch@sun.ac.za

Kathryn Olsen

Kathryn Olsen

olsenk1@ukzn.ac.za

Grant Olwage

Grant Olwage

Grant.Olwage@wits.ac.za

Grant Olwage is a lecturer in the Wits School of Arts. He came to Wits from the University of Amsterdam, where he was a research fellow, and is a graduate of Christ Church College, University of Oxford, and Rhodes University. He teaches primarily in the area of music history, and his interests traverse the gamut of western art music, South African music and popular music, though his focus is on musics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Grant’s research interests include Victoriana, the voice, aspects of South African and American music, and (some) popular music. He is the editor of Composing Apartheid: Music For and Against Apartheid (Wits University Press, 2008), and his recent work on Paul Robeson is published and forthcoming in the Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of Musicology, and The Musical Quarterly. He is currently working on a monograph on Paul Robeson’s voice.

Rebekka Sandmeier

Rebekka Sandmeier

rebekka.sandmeier@uct.ac.za

Rebekka Sandmeier is professor of musicology at and director of the South African College of Music, University of Cape Town.

She studied music and modern English literature at Trinity College Dublin (Ireland). In 1997 she completed her Ph.D. in musicology with a thesis on “Text and Music in German Operas of the 1920s”. From 1999 to 2008 she worked as a lecturer in musicology at the University of Münster (Germany) where she was awarded the Habilitation with a study on “Sacred vocal polyphony and early humanism in England”. In 2009 and 2010 she was deputy professor of musicology at the universities of Potsdam (Germany) and Münster (Germany).

Since coming to the SACM she has initiated a range of projects relating to early music and historically informed performance. In addition she heads a collaborative project between the SACM, the community centre iThemba Labantu in Philippi and the Berliner Missionswerk, bringing music education to the children of the township.

She has published widely on English music, opera and oratorio as well as music of the 15th, 19th and early 20th century. Her current research interest centers on oratorios in 19th century Germany, and on the liturgical manuscripts in the Grey Collection of the National Library of South Africa.

In her spare time she plays baroque violin or viola da gamba in various ensembles and enjoys riding her motorbike.

Cara Stacey

Cara Stacey

cara.stacey@gmail.com

Cara Stacey is a South African musician, composer and researcher. She holds a Masters in musicology (Edinburgh University) and an MMus in musical performance (SOAS, London). Cara is a doctoral candidate at the University of Cape Town, a Commonwealth Split-Site Scholar and a NRF Freestanding Doctoral Scholar. She is a doctoral research scholar attached to the Archive and Public Culture Research Initiative at UCT.

Cara is a founding member of Inclement Quartet and collaborates with percussionist and drummer Sarathy Korwar in the project Pergola. Her album (released in September 2015, Kit Records) “Things that grow” features Shabaka Hutchings, Seb Rochford, Ruth Goller, and Crewdson.

Lee Watkins

Lee Watkins

l.watkins@ru.ac.za

Lee Watkins studied Ethnomusicology at UKZN where he had focused on rap music in South Africa and the University of Hong Kong where he conducted ethnographic research on Filipino musicians in Hong Kong. His interests are music in relation to social and economic development, heritage, tourism, marginalisation, migration studies, and rap music in South Africa. Currently, he is serving as the Director of the International Library of African Music (ILAM).

Willemien Froneman

Willemien Froneman

Ex officio member (SAMUS editors)

willemien.froneman@gmail.com

Willemien Froneman holds an M.Phil in Musicology from Cambridge University and a Ph.D in Music from Stellenbosch University. She is currently research fellow at Africa Open: Institute for Music, Research and Innovation, Stellenbosch University, and co-editor of SAMUS: South African Music Studies.

Stephanus Muller

Stephanus Muller

Ex officio member (SAMUS editors)

smuller@sun.ac.za

Stephanus Muller is a Professor at Stellenbosch University where he lectures in musicology and is the founder and Principal Investigator of Africa Open – Institute for Music, Research and Innovation that has developed from the Documentation Centre for Music (DOMUS).

He studied piano with Prof Joseph Stanford and Ms Marian Friedman and organ with Prof SC Zondagh at Pretoria University. He completed his BMus degree in performance in 1992 and studied musicology at Unisa with Prof Bernhard van der Linde and Prof Niel Geldenhuys. In 1998 he was awarded a MMus from Unisa and a Master of Studies from the University of Oxford. In 2001 he received his DPhil from Oxford for a thesis on South African music and identity politics written under the supervision of Prof Roger Parker. Before joining Stellenbosch in 2005, he lectured at the University of the Free State.

From 2004-2006 he was the Chairman of the Musicological Society of Southern Africa, and he currently serves on the Executive Committee of the South African Society for Research in Music in the capacity of co-editor of the societys journal. He has edited NewMusicSA and a guest issue of SAMUS on the music of Peter Klatzow. He is also the co-editor of A Composer in Africa: Essays on the Life and Work of Stefans Grové (2005) and Gender, Sexuality and Music in South Africa (2004). His acclaimed biographical fiction on the life and work of the composer Arnold van Wyk, Nagmusiek (2014), has been awarded the Jan Rabie-Rapport Book Prize for fiction, the kykNet-Rapport Book Prize for non-fiction as well as the Debut prize from the University of Johannesburg.